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raiding my legal knowledge on the basis of that is how you accurately interpret the law. but you can proceed on whatever additional subtanive additional arguments that you have. >> the sunshine ordinance is quite clear. you cannot use that balancing test, any balancing test with 1040 or 6254.7 and,.13. you can't use balancing tests, not in san francisco. >> i believe somewhere along the lines, the ethics commission in their response which the sunshine ordinance task force rejected, indicated that the ethics commission, the ethics commission staff indicated and i believe so did the city controller, that they were withholding based on 6254 f. that did not apply either ethics, our ethics commission, or to the city controller's office. 6254 f, says that records of complaints are investigations conducted by or records of intelligence information or security procedures of the office of attorney general and the department of justice. and any state or local police agency or any investigate compiled by any other state or local police agency those records can be withheld. you are saying the et
that there is going to be some perception. the law does provide, though, that even some perception of bias is permissible in a situation like this where you have no legal conflict and we really don't have other options that would allow us to have somebody else adjudicate it. >> may i complaint on that point? >> you will have that opportunity, mr., shaw. so, i am not sure that we have a choice. it doesn't sound like we have a choice. and i, i don't think that an advisory opinion will be particularly helpful if we have to readjudicate it. >> i agree. >> i am not sure that this is, where they have to make determinations related to the executive directors that they hire and work with and conduct business together, that they investigate harassment complaints, whistle blower complaints they seek outside of the council to do that if they are well-organized. but they handle those because it is their job to do so. and i... so i raised it because we do want to be careful and thorough. but i think at this point it might make sense to proceed with the hearing from the attorney and mr. shaw and public
and determine whether any documents in it are must be disclosed under state law. and that is what the ethics commission does. so i think and i hope that answers part of your question. the second part and maybe this responds, is when the ethics commission investigates allegations of sunshine allegations involving other departments, they may, depending on the discorrection of the investigate or to review the documents that were not disclosed in order to determine what to do and how to proceed in their investigation. i think in this case, miss herrick could seek to review the files of the ethics commission to determine whether those files are documents that must be disclose under state law. i can speak for the whistle blower program. >> miss herrick, did you review the documents in the possession that were maintained by the ethics commission related to this matter? >> i did not. and just in response to your... all of your questions, we did talk a bit about, apen disd3, 699-1 3a of the city charter which does make the city records confidential. and consistent with any advice that we would get fr
affect future laws and could overturn as many as 170 laws on the books. so this would be endlessly litigated and gives union bosses more authority than the legislature. >> so, what kind of laws would be -- that have been passed that most people in michigan would say, we have come to live with them, the were settled democratically, people agreed, the legislature passed them, the for signed them. we had elections afterwards. what laws would be overturned? >> there are two laws in particular that they're concerned about. one is the so-called 80-20 law which says that taxpayers don't need to pay more than 80% of public employees pension benefits. and the other one is a law basically regarding teachers. the fact that there have been some school reforms that have allowed various merit measures and teacher promotion measures that could also be overturned by this. this is something that michelle rei, the former dc schools chancellor who runs a students first group, is very concerned about and her group made a big ad in michigan to fight this. >> governor rick snyder, the republican in mich
that not following the law as written, is wrong. and quit advising them to do it. this also referred to the district attorney office as well as this. >> good evening, commissioners, my name is dr. derek kerr. and i have comment that relates to the executive director's report and your annual report to the board. as you know, protection of whistle blowers is one of your mandates, it is in article four of the campaign and government conduct code. but your work in this area is invisible. there is nothing about whistle blower retaliation in your minutes for the last seven years, or your director's reports, or your annual reports. recently the controller's whistle blower program has been reporting retaliation complaints. 17, this year, none substantiate. since 1995 none have been by this body. each year you are required to provide a report to the board of supervisors. one requirement is that you note the number of complaints that you have received. another requirement is to report, the type of conduct complained about, unquote. and so please consider adding whistle blower retaliation to the categories of
heads have done the form 700 certification required by law and the whole city is out of order. to quote al pacino and go giants. >> hi there, i am one of the two whistle blowers, and from my perspective what i am asking for is actually not confidential investigatory information, what we wanted to know about is whether there was an administrative memo during the time that the ethics commission sat on our case for six months while the two of us were driven out of laguna honda ordering the whistle blower to not concurrently investigate the case. and in theory, according to your rules, the ethics commission should have sent a written memo to the whistle blower program, or they should have carried on a concurrent investigation but they didn't, and we would like to see the memo. it is not idle curiosity, we served the city for 43 years between the two of them and then they were sum marry removed after blowing the whistle. thank you very much. >> hi, i just want to... i just want to bring your attention, again to the fact that i sat there all of these hears, every single one of them and the me
the libel make markets more transparent, stable and efficient. from george washington university law school, and this is 45 minutes. >> good morning. i am paul berman, 19 of the law school as art said and i want to welcome you to this conference and obviously welcome mary schapiro, chairman of the securities and exchange commission. so one of the things that i think makes this law school, the george washington university law school distinctive and different from other top law schools is the degree to which we are integrated into the real world of law and policy practice in this country. so one of the things we are always striving to do this not be an ivory tower academic institution solely, but also one that is always trying to engage the practicing bar, people from corporations, people who are not lawyers in the educational enterprise and also when public policy discussions. obviously we have a great advantage in being in washington d.c. and having so much access to the world of policy. but in addition, it's not just the location. it has to be your orientation as a law school. so it is som
lot did not take in end. under the law, if you did not file a complaint with the government within six months of the first discriminatory paycheck she got decades before, if she did not file a complaint, whether she knew about it or not, within six months of the first is the mandatory paycheck, -- first discriminatory paycheck, that employer was home free. it could pay her less every paycheck from then on. open and explicitly. there was nothing she could do about it except leave the job. that is what the supreme court said congress meant when it passed these laws prohibiting pay discrimination. it was a vigorous dissent from justice and ruth bader ginsberg that this made no sense whatsoever. she was joined by three other justices. first of all, who knowsafter six months that you pay is less -- second, if you know and you have enough of evidence, are you going to file a complaint within six months of the paycheck? are you going to figure, ok,i will prove my work and not be labeled as a troublemaker. it basically took that decision in what have some called a technicality and took away wo
law that would require drug testing for racehorses. it would stiffen penalties for those who break the rules. the committee is reviewing the proposal which would require drug testing. >> the man accused of killing florida teenager trayvon martin appeared in court today. george zimmerman has pleaded not guilty to second-degree murder charges. prosecutors asked for a gag order to prevent defense attorneys and witnesses from talking to the media. they say doing so could eventually influence jurors. >>> the federal judge set to reside over the liability trial for the gulf oil spill delayed the start of the proceeding till next february. the trial had been set to start january 14th. the super bowl would be in new orleans february 3rd followed by february 12th. the explosion killed 11 rig workers and sent millions of barrels of oil into the gulf of mexico for almost 90 days. >> a ktvu investigation into the spending of public money by port of oakland officials is drawing swift response. what the mayor's office is now requesting. >> and a new epicenter for san francisco sports is emerging
will be on the streets and also additional units from law- enforcement agencies could also becoming as well. >> this is going to be a more familiar sight on the streets of oakland in the near future. several teams on the california highway patrol are going to be handling traffic stops and other vehicle related issues. this is all an effort to crack down on crime. on a news conference near jean quan and chief jordan are speaking what they need more resources. the we have seen a spike in crime this year is a serious concern that is why we have reached out to the chp. >> there is no doubt that we need more police and we can see that on we have more police, crime goes down. >> oakland has 627 officers. that is the lowest number in decades although specifics on how many officers from the c h p and how they're going to pay is still cutting worked out. the captain of the c h p explains the critical role the officers will play. but what we are expanding law enforcement. but the people that are traveling. >> oakland officials have been working with governor brown to make this situation happened. it
an arson in his law offices. >>> the giants are halfway there but san francisco is dusting off the playbook for a victory parade >>> complete bay area news coverage starts right now. this is bay area news at 7:00. >>> good evening. it is friday october 26th, i'm gasia mikaelian, this is bay area news at 7:00. the death of a 16-year-old girl has left classmates at albany high trying to cope tonight and asking questions about what happened. the teenage girl had a promising future. >> reporter: well, this girl was on the tennis team, here on the courts today were some of her teammates who were practicing. folks were too upset to say much only to say they were having a tough time. >> reporter: a facebook page was started to share fond memories, kathy's body was found sunday. investigators had trouble identifying her until a classmate saw a news report and helped make the connection. the coroner says it will take about two weeks to get the results of a toxicology report and confirm how she died. so far there are no obvious signs of foul play. >> i know a lot of people are heartbroken. >> reall
of wrong dog. >> do you have not think that a man who has been found guilty by due process of law ought to be slightly penitant? >> if it is in fact due process. you see, jeremy, your problem is you have no idea how that system operates. and you should know something about that. >> you're the one who chose to locate his business there. >> i did, yes. >> were you just foolish or what? >> in fact, i'd say that's slightly overstating it, but i made a mistake. i underestimated the vin at and corruption of the american legal system. i confess to that. i'm very penitant about it, too. >> what's astonishing is a man who has been through this should show no humidity and no shame. >> of course not. i've been persecuted half to death. i don't have any shame. i'm proud of having been in a u.s. federal prison and survived as well as i did. i had no problems whatsoever, not in the regime and not amongst the fellow residents. let me tell you something -- i am proud of having gone through the terribly difficult process of being falsely charged, falsely convicted and ultimately almost completely vindic
that sense of purpose and i went to school at hastings college of law. there i served as vice president of one of the largest law schools, largest public law schools in the country. i took that sense of purpose, and i applied to the san francisco courts indegint panel and there i work on behalf excuse the expression, dirt poor residents who cannot afford an attorney of their own. but i did not stop there. i took that sense of purpose, and i founded the radio and television program that originate, on ksfs called folk law to give voice to the issues facing san francisco now these are not the issues that make the 10:00 o'clock news, these are the issues like parking, these are the issues like domestic violence prevention and funding for the arts that are dear to my heart and are dear to the hearts of residents as well. folks, this election, is about the future. but i do know one thing here in the present, i know that working with my neighbors, my community members, whether you are a laborer or someone in the tech field or an artist, i know that one thing, we can overcome any of the challen
dozen states had laws against interracial marriage. >> narrator: he would not see his son for ten years. >> barry obama had a pretty unsettling childhood. i mean, he didn't ow his father. his mother was very loving and protective, but she was also finding herself. basically, he and she grew up together. >> she then became involved with an indonesian and married him and had a child with him. so she had two biracial children from different cultures who she raised largely by herself. >> narrator: they lived in jakarta. he was now called barry soetoro. his stepfather lolo was troubled. >> he's drinking quite a lot. there's evidence of at least one act of domestic violence against her. >> narrator: stanley ann taught english. while she worked, barry had to learn how to cope. >> imagine what it would be like at age six to be thrown into thn chaotic, swirling environment of a dense neighborhood in jakarta, indonesia, not knowing the language, not knowing anything, looking a little different. he had to fend for himself. every step along the way, there was some aspect, deep aspect of him where h
with you. the body of law and rule is incredibly complicated. some of that does pertain to the evil banker hypothesis. i'm amended hereby the corollary evil lobbyist hypothesis, but i would add my own cause, which is the cubicle regulator aided and abetted by the expert lawyer hypothesis. and maybe in my practice i spend a lot of time. and the bells of these rules. and when you say okay, i think i had it. here's the definition of proprietary trading. some lawyer will say well, actually there was lawler versus knickerbocker case in 1842 in which that definition was not upheld -- so for this to be really clear, with another 52 pages in the federal register. that may be good lawyering, but it is incoherent rulemaking. i don't know what to do about it. i just say this is one of my personally favored hypotheses is a big problem of complexity risk and why i go back to a few clear standards to which real institutions accountable, i written on the poker rules mav is hispanic@. we have to make some clear decisions here. this current come in never never land that's largely constructed by people to d
at 6:00, a vallejo man is behind bars for a series of arson, including one that injured a law office. they linked mod love to a jun fire at the mortuary and church fire in july and september fire at the office of mayor davis. firefighters extinguished those flames within minutes. a search of court records shows the suspect and mayor davis might have been acquainted. a plaintiff by the name of mod love is having filed a case against davis in small claims court in 2005. that was two years before davis became mayor. details on the case or who won that case were not available. the police say the investigation is not yet finished. >> the man a former yahoo! executive living with his wife and kids in san francisco's valley and year ago moved to new york and just last night they were shattered aeldly by their own nanny. the krims moved to the bay area before going to manhattan and took a job at ccnbc, they found the children dead in a bathtub. the family's 50-year-old nanny was lying nearby with a knife by her side. >> we know she was referred by another family, that an employee of this fam
bail. they're due back for another hearing. >> the teenager accused of killing his sister-in-law and her two children in the sacramento suburb of ran chough cordova was charged with three counts of murder. grigory also faces an enhanced murder charge. he was arrested wednesday after his brother came home to find his wife, 3-year-old daughter and 2-year-old son all dead. >> the family of two children allegedly stabbed to death by their nanny in new york has ties to the bay area. their father kevin krim is a former yahoo executive who now works for cnbc. his wife came home last night with the couple's 3-year-old daughter and found 6-year-old lucia and 2-year-old leo stabbed to death in the bathtub. their nanny suffered what investigators are calling self- inflicted stab wounds. she remains in the hospital tonight. >> you could hear a lot of screaming. like panic screaming. >> kevin krim was a vice president at yahoo. >> a 66-year-old woman is facing prison time for embezzling more than $100,000 from a convent. linda gomez bought jewelry, high end cutlery and other high end items wi
. they passed 26 laws in hundreds of states. they have here a woman who is attacked, called a slut for wanting access to contraception and a candidate that just said, i wouldn't phrased it that way. exactly how would he have phrased it? >> that's a false narrative. >> i don't want to get off the topic of women -- okay. i will give you that time. i want to get to the impact on swing voters so-called by "the new york times" waitress mom and what is this going to do to the pitch battle in ohio, in florida, in virginia for women voters in the united states. >> we see the so-called waitress moms. we love the heart of tagging that. >> fancy that. >> these are women who typically voted for president obama in the last election cycle. but are struggling with, we are struggling economically has he upheld his promise and still don't love romney as an option either. we are seeing and talking about the women's issues, they are family issues. these are household issues. they are economic issues. access to healthcare, access to birth control. how many kids we have, those are economic issues. it's going to co
is civil-rights issue and talk about the economic impact of the marriage equality law in new york. with the 8000 gay and lesbian couples have been married in near cities and the law passed last year. but every riding is this television -- every wedding is a celebration that generates revenues for our businesses. six marriages generated more than two and $59 million -- gay marriage generate more than $259 and last month. >> it passed, maryland would be the first day to pass marriage quality. >> the question may face is not if marriage equality will come to all 50 states but when. marylanders have a chance to lead the way on election day. >> you can take a closer look at question 6 and all the other statewide ballot questions. there are a few of them this year on our commitment 2012 mobile app and wbal tv.com >> would you would call a dinar -- what you would call a bizarre situation. >> a mother comes home to find her two that children murdered. the person report of the response of feet irresponsible, their nanny. -- reportedly responsible, and their nanny. >> the weather is quiet n
, save money, or both. and check out the preventive benefits you get after the health care law. medicare open enrollment. now's the time. visit medicare.gov or call 1-800-medicare. ♪ fox news weather. east coast bracing for one of the worst in decades. hurricane sandy posing a serious threat for folks from washington to maine. several governors declared an emergency and residents are urged to stosock up on food, water and battery. latest information is that sandy is strengthening again. don't let this fool you. it is not a typical hurricane or storm. it is the pressure that dropped 99 milibars. and a stronger storm than you typically see. and in the northeast main land making the track by the time we get to monday afternoon. it is bad news for the jersey shore and long island. there may be storm surge right where you see the l-shape. the water goes in and no way to get out. we are concerned about beach damage . look at the model predictions. 11 inches. and that is in the outer banks. new york city and 7 in baltimore and the storm is going far inland and across far interio
. >> an arrest made in connection with a fire at the law offices of the vallejo mayor >> and the training exercise drawing people from around the world to right here. >> the news starts right now. this is ktvu mornings on 2. >> good morning. welcome to mornings on two. it's saturday october 27th. >> let's check in with rosemary for a quick look at what to expect. >> yes. good morning. its going to be a pleasant day. we are still waiting for the break of dawn but mostly clear skies. it's a cool saturday in some cases but not as much as yesterday. mostly sunny, mild to warm, on the flip side more wet weather on the way. it could come in time for halloween. >> following developing news out of san francisco right now. a woman is badly injured after a shooting and a car crash. >> reporter: it happened just before four this morning in city's western edition neighborhood. according to a detective a 30- year-old woman who was driving this car, you see flipped over -- that's now in the process of getting towed. she was shot four times and while on the way to the hospital she said she had bee
beloved cousin and in law. prayers as you move through this season of sorrow. and of grief. thank you for sharing george breathes with you. profoundly george stanley mcgovern as a son an example of our heritage, i each of you for coming celebrate and honor senator mcgovern's life and witness. to share the mcgovern family's brief. to political colleague, a trusted mentor -- [no audio] and prairie form them to embrace common person and to tirelessly worked for the common good. george mcgovern was also a prairie prophet. he called and inspired an generation to do justice, to love mercy and to walk with our god. he focused the world's on the plight of the hungry. fought for peace. he called on us to repent a misguided, wasteful, and selfish to seeking and speaking the truth. articulate it in his hometown to and not in nazareth to preach the good news to the poor, to be prisoners, to give sight to the blind and to proclaim the year of the lord's savior. we can learn much from jesus' experience in bringing good to the poor and liberating the oppressed. of teaching and preaching in galilee.
exploded. the court decision wiped away the gray area in our campaign finance law. so now there are no limits to what outside groups can do. and so what we're seeing now is an explosion in that area. although it's a problem that existed before citizens united. >> i want to pick up on what leslie was saying earlier. the 501(c)(3)s -- these are all named obviously for the codes, for the tax codes. the 501(c)(3)s where we actually see an enormous number of progressive action going on in these non-profits, they are barred. they can't write these checks. so to me that's where it feels like there is part of this critical asymmetry occurring. is that right, the difference between the threes and fours. >> there are ones that aren't ideological at all. sometimes the group that benefits a local library is a 501(c)(3). it's charitable organization. a c-4 can spend in elections. because there are so many wealthy donors and corporations on the right, this election cycle to defeat president obama, they are pouring money into these groups that don't have disclose -- >> that $74 million s
a suspect for torching the law offices of vallejo's mayor. the mayor at the time called it a act of intimidation. the suspect is charged with setting fires in a vallejo funeral home. and at a church. this is evening held in the jail on three counts of arson. >> two teenagers have been arrested for the murder of a woman found dead in a house fire last week. here is a picture of one suspect. the 18-year-old made his first court appearance this afternoon. investigators believe he and a 16-year-old whose picture we do not have brutally beat the victim and then set her body on fire to cover up a burglary. he is 16 years old but has been charged as an adult in this case. he's a relative of the victim. police arrested him in tennessee. >> san francisco police are warning muni riders to be careful when using their smart phones. there have been thousands. thousands of thefts reported this year. if you're not paying attention, authorities say you're wearing a target on your back. we're live with the story. that is an incredible number of thefts. >> that is right. about 2000. but that is wh
wall street." he is now a senior fellow and adjunct professor at the new york university school of law. neil barofsky, welcome. >> thank you. >> when you were a kid, did you say, "mom, dad, i want to grow up and be an inspector general?" >> no, i said i wanted to be a lawyer, though. >> you did? >> it must be some sort of major genetic flaw i have. but my mom keeps a fortune cookie that said, "you will be a great lawyer one day." and i signed it and dated it. i thini was 12 years old.12 so there was something weird about me that i wanted to be a lawyer. i wanted to be a prosecutor. i mean, that was sort of what i wanted to do. maybe it's from watching tv shows, "perry mason," as a kid or something like that. but i was always drawn to the law. and so i think i did have this drive for public service. but certainly never did think that i'd be an inspector general one day. i didn't rlly even know what ll that was until i actually got at the job, to be honest with you. >> when you took the job, i read about you. and i thought, "why is someone like that, with that record of prosecution going
, law and order, welfare reform, were actually able to be implemented walking on egg shells, terrified they are going to say some word that's going to be deemed, you know, an incipient klan sentiment and that's why the crux of my book is the turning point of the o.j. verdict when i think white america saw black people cheering the acquittal of an obviously guilty black celebrity and said that's it, the white guilt bank is shut down. not only did that help race relations, it specifically helped black people as republican policies that had been pushed for years but demagogued as racist, law and order, welfare reform, were actually able to be implemented helping black people most of all. i mean, helping everyone but helping -- giuliani's policies in new york saved tens of thousands of black lives and i don't know if he would have been able to continue with his very tough on crime policies which were in fact demagogued as racist while he was implementing them, if you didn't have this change in feeling in america where people were just sick of hearing of being accused of racism. >> let's ta
. >> in the oakland police department is getting some help from fellow law enforcements. the highway patrol is going to back of the police carry it >> there is no closures this weekend on the san mateo bridge. we will be right back. >> we are back. it is looking really pretty outside. it is looking very breezy due to the trees blowing. >> let's go ahead and did the forecast. teachin. >> we are expecting plenty of sunshine for the afternoon. our temperatures will be warmer than yesterday. as for your temperatures it will be mostly forties' right now outside. it is still very chilly in san jose. the high pressure the dissident off of the cole's is really what is bringing us the warmer temperatures. it will be up for 70's for the afternoon. it will be 81 degrees in livermore valley and upper 60's for the coast this afternoon. 80 degrees for santa rosa and 72 degrees for downtown san francisco. headed our way and how hurricane san the can affect the world series. >> ihere is a video of the giants are arriving in detroit. the team arrived on friday and we were the only ones there. kron4 was the only newh
. at our luncheons, we never talked about law, about which, of course, i knew very little. we talked mainly about religion and economics, religion being my subject and economics being jude wanniski's subject. and everyone was interested, and we became very good friends and have been very good friends, all of us, since then. c-span: did you ever talk about some of the things we've just talked about in--in the s--like aristotle and plato and whether... >> guest: oh, sure. c-span: of those three men, like judge silberman at the appeals court here or justice scalia at the supreme court or robert bork, the former appeals court judge--did they read all the same kind of things that you read? >> guest: i think some of them were moved to. yeah, some of them probably had already. i don't know. but they were interested. i mean, these are not just lawyers, these are not just legal thinkers. all of these people are what we would call intellectuals, namely have a very broad interest in ideas. and the thing they liked about being at aei is they were able to indulge that interest in ideas. c-span: do you h
-year sentence, and was immediately reduced to one year due to an amnesty law from 2006. berlusconi was also fined 10 million euros and then form -- from holding public office for 10 years. the head of the media said television empire was accused of running a complex tax evasion system in the 1990's. prosecutors said berlusconi was part of a scheme to purchase broadcast rights to film through offshore companies and then inflate the cost to reduce taxes owed. the former prime minister will remain free until italy's appeal system is exhausted, a process that could be quite lengthy. >> for more on this case, we will tend to john hooper in rome. berlusconi was sentenced to four years but apparently will only serve one year if at all. how likely is it he will serve any time? >> very unlikely indeed. the italian judicial system is one in which trials take a long time, and there are also very generous statutes of limitation that time out cases often before they have completed the process, which involved two appeals. so there is a long way to run. it is almost certain that sometime late 2013, early
advocate of affordable housing and rights of immigrants and renters at his time at the law caucus. after 20 years for the government as investigator for the whistle blower program and director of city purchasing department of public works and city administrator prior to his appointment and election as the city's first chinese american mayor and first asian elected to the office and please join us welcoming our mayor edward m lee. [applause] >> wow thank you very much. good evening everyone. well, it's my pleasure to be here with you tonight and to participate in the recognition and honor of our great leaders from the latino community, and i tell you there are so much construction that our latino community is providing the city in every way possible, the arts, law enforcement, restorative justice, all of the different services in the city, so i am excited to be here tonight and it's my personal pleasure to be joined here to have our democratic leader nancy pelosi also join in this community celebration. [applause] while we all know that latino heritage month is particularly importance to
time making it right. >> also, the grandparents rented her in laws apartment during a brief stay. she didn't know their son was kevin krim. >> they mentioned their children lived around the corner. and i knew them. >> many are young couple was children ready for halloween. nannies walk pushing strollers, ann ben yet told me this part is dubbed nanny valley. she knows all of them. but on weekends? >> i recognize kids but they're with they're parents. >> almost everyone i spoke with knew what happened to the family. >> of course it goes through your mind. and you just have to go with your gut. >> cleveland says she ask her friends take no chances they go through services, that helped them pick nannies. >> all nannies are prescreened so this can help you cut through some of the stuff you might not do. >> kevin krim heard the news from police who were waiting for him at the airport when he returned last night if a business trip. comcast and nbc issued a statement that says sadness we feel for the family is without measure. >> and we're going to talk to the owner of a nanny agency who want
in support of commissioner wu, hillis and sugaya looking at this as a strange cu. if the law is indeed unclear and if indeed the commission at that time five years ago and only commissioner antonini would have been part of that would have been inclined to be nice . the reality is that our role is for to interpret the code in a manner that goes beyond our tenure here on this particular dais. this interpretation is why we try as best as possible to up hold the rules so this becomes rule of law and i believe in this particular case, even if you i am happy to hear that the owner has made contributions to a well liked place in the neighborhood and positive changes in the block i think it is the situation itself and the ambiguity of what was done five years ago where we would only be creating insult to injury by creating more complicated conditions and in the event this owner, and i hope he won't and sell the bar it would remain a bar and could take all the rights and nuisances that come with the definition of bar and for that reason i cannot support this. i make a motion that it be denied.
a law office was guilty of that fire and two others. we go now live with the latest on the story. alan, it sounds like they have made the connection. >> and they think he set a funeral home and church on fire too. we found out the connection goes back more than a decade ago. >> when the mayor surveyed the damage of his burned out law office last month, he told abc7 news he believed the attack was politically motivated. >> i can tell you the motive was not politically motivated. he has disdain for the system and the rules we are governed by. >> reporter: 44-year-old maud love used an ago sell rent to set fire to the mayor's office. >> did the mayor even know who he was, who he is? >> again that's not something i want to comment on. >> reporter: according to family members, love asked the mayor to handle his mother's estate after she died in 1999. love ended up being forced out of the house his mother owned and family members say love has always blamed the mayor. records show love filed a civil suit against obey -- osbey davis. >> we have been looking at him as a lead in a series of arso
. >> thank you very much. >>> a man uh us coulded -- accused of torching a law office was guilty of that fire and two others. we go now live with the latest on the story. alan, it sounds like they have made the connection. >> and they think he set a funeral home and church on fire too. we found out the connection goes back more than a decade ago. >> when the mayor surveyed the damage of his burned out law office last month, he told abc7 news he believed the attack was politically motivated. >> i can tell you the motive was not politically motivated. he has disdain for the system and the rules we are governed by. >> reporter: 44-year-old maud love used an ago sell rent to set fire to the mayor's office. >> did the mayor even know who he was, who he is? >> again that's not something i want to comment on. >> reporter: according to family members, love asked the mayor to handle his mother's estate after she died in 1999. love ended up being forced out of the house his mother owned and family members say love has always blamed the mayor. records show love filed a civil suit against obey -- osbey d
while worshiping. their perspective is humanistic and less dogmatic. they worship the son-in-law of the profit mohammad. men and women are symbolically equal, which they show by watching each other's hands. -- washing each other's hands. >> the creator made a man and woman out of a drop of water. if that is how he sought, why shouldn't we treat them equally? >> for sunnis, such an immense amount to heresy. they generally keep their traditions and songs to themselves. the syrian dictator is part of a related sect. >> if there is a dictatorship, the people should get rid of it. it is not the business of other countries to get involved. we have seen what has happened in the so-called arab spring. >> such statements don't win alawis much sympathy. they fear the consequences of a takeover by radical sunnis. >> the alawis fear this will intensify the language in turkey and around. although i personally think it is wrong to support assad on political grounds, i can understand the concerns the al awis have. >> buildings were spray-painted to mock them out. that is made family is afraid o
, great discussion. >> why are critics charging that the healthcare law is bribing doctors to take on membermore patients featuring the ultimate value rzr 570. the only 4-passenger sport machines, lead by the all-new rzr xp 4. and the undisputed king of high performance, rzr xp. razor sharp performance. only from polaris. get huge rebates on 2012's and low financing on all models during the polaris factory authorized clearance. as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...bubuyou still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios crilticings slamming the health care law. they are labeling it taxpayer funded bribe. you agree with the criticings. >> this is cronyism, cheryl. the president goes around with a bag of goodis and hand out. cheap loans for students and solyndra for the greens and of course, this extra payment for medicare patients? and paying some doctors more to treat patients more for two years and a total arbitrary confusing plan instead of addressing the entitlement. he is getting votes in the process. >> it is only a temporary measure and only lasting two
, not that he-- the problem isn't that he violated the first law of the fetus club which is don't talk about fetus club, like that's not-- because it's the idea. i mean where does mourdock get his crazy fringe ideas about rape and abortion anyway? i done know, maybe from mitt romney's running mate, paul ryan who cosponsored a sanctity of human life act so severe it not only could outlaw all abortions but also could effectively ban in-vitro fertilization or the platform of the republican party-- calls for a human life amendment to the constitution. nothing in there about exceptions for rape, incest, life of the mother or feelings of swing voters. in other words, accord together republican party platform, and the man who wants to be a heartbeat away from a presidency, if a woman wants to have a baby, in-vitro fertilization, she cannot. rape, she has to. no wonder they buried it on page 14, rather than than splashing it across the cover. we'll be right back. (cheers and applause) >> jon: my guest tonight is the house democratic minority leader and served california's 8th district. please welcom
. >> oh, yes they change the law and make the crimes legal. this is what obama understood in april of '08. he nailed it. he said these guys changed the rules of the game. allowed them to operate by like bandits, and it was done under george w. bush's watch. there isn't difference between romney and bush. >> that raises the critical question. why doesn't the romney campaign say look at the parallel of george w. bush it seems to be a winning argument. >> and it's an accurate one. we lost the populous in obama. interest is no spirit there. there is no guts. that's why he lost the first debate. he's not feeling our pain. the pain is very widespread. if you lost your house 50 million americans have lost their homes or they're going to lose it. they have to change neighbors give up schools. their kids think they're losers. they did something wrong. this guy is not addressing this. >> eliot: was he more akin to the plutocats that you write so persuasively about in your book. >> i think by invocation and personality he's a techno contract. he could be member of the plutocats if he wanted to. that
subordinate units and to our adjacent units or inter agency partners whether in law enforcement or fire or emergency management to bring in and collect all that information to a central node and our emergency center that filters the information i need to make decisions. now, our common operating picture, we developed initially based on military platforms. but we've migrate it had to a web-based solution that is open to all of our inter agency partners. it's on the dot-gov domain, it's password protected but it's not on our military proprietary systems. so, we can share the common operating picture that we have with cal ema and we've developed the ability to import data from every allied organization whether it's usgs, the law enforcement agencies, fire, weather, what have you, to be able to put it out in layers so we literally can know everything going on. we can see lightning strikes that cause fires, down to the size of a car fire. we're often able to do predictive analysis that exceeds the ability of fire and other agencies and able to call them up because we can see this and we've t
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